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Transportation Systems Management (TSM)

alt tag hereThe Transportation Systems Management (TSM) approach to congestion mitigation seeks to identify improvements to enhance the capacity of existing system of an operational nature.  Through better management and operation of existing transportation facilities, these techniques are designed to improve traffic flow, air quality, and movement of vehicles and goods, as well as enhance system accessibility and safety. 

Transportation systems management strategies are low-cost but effective in nature, which include, but are not limited to:

  • Intersection and signal improvements
  • Freeway bottleneck removal programs
  • Data collection to monitor system performance
  • Special events management strategies

Traffic signal and intersection improvements include such elements as:

  • signal timing optimization
  • controller/cabinet and signal head upgrades
  • vehicle detectors repair/replacement
  • communication with a central system
  • turning lanes
  • grade separations
  • pavement striping
  • lane assignment changes
  • signage and lighting

Freeway and arterial bottleneck removal consists of identifying congested locations and improving such elements as:

  • insufficient acceleration/deceleration lanes and ramps
  • weaving sections
  • sharp horizontal/vertical curves
  • narrow lanes and shoulders
  • inadequate signage and pavement striping
  • other geometric deficiencies

The identification and elimination of traffic bottlenecks can greatly improve traveling conditions and enhance system capacity, reliability, and safety, especially during peak periods.  TSM projects can complement the major capacity improvements and infrastructure by providing improved traffic flow on arterials and local streets.

NCTCOG's Current TSM Projects:

1) Thoroughfare Assessment Program (TAP)/Traffic Signal Integration and Monitoring Program.  The purpose of this program is to improve traffic flow and enhance the capacity of existing arterial systems by implementing new signal timing and low-cost operational improvements along selected corridors, which include but are not limited to:

  • lane assignment changes
  • vehicle detector upgrades
  • addition of pedestrian push buttons
  • signal head upgrades
  • controller and cabinet upgrades
  • communication with central computer
  • addition of GPS clocks
  • re-striping

Improved and coordinated traffic flow will result in improvement of the air quality standards in the Dallas- Fort Worth nonattainment area. This project is implemented in three phases as listed below:

TAP Phase 2.0:  Phase 2.0 of this Program was completed in July 2009. Signal retiming and low-cost operational improvements at selected locations were implemented on 20 corridors with 482 signalized intersections in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area. Review the TAP Phase 2.0 Executive Summary.

TAP Phase 3.1:  This phase of the program was completed in December 2009, and included 13 corridors with 258 signalized intersections in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area. Review the TAP Phase 3.1 Executive Summary.

TAP Phase 3.2: This phase of the program was completed in December 2009, and included 60 corridors with 1,178 signalized intersections in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area. Review the TAP Phase 3.2 Executive Summary prepared by Kimley-Horn and Associates.  Review the TAP Phase 3.2 Executive Summary prepared by Teal Engineering Services.

2) Regional Traffic Signal Retiming Program (RTSRP). The purpose of this program is to improve traffic flow and enhance the capacity of existing arterial systems by implementing new signal timing and low-cost operational improvements along selected corridors. Improved and coordinated traffic flow will result in improvement of the air quality standards in the Dallas-Fort Worth nonattainment area. This project is implemented in two phases as listed below:

RTSRP Phase 1: This phase of the program began in January 2010, and includes 26 corridors with 500 signalized intersections in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area. Signal retiming and low-cost operational improvements at selected locations will be implemented under this phase of the project by March 31, 2014.

RTSRP Phase 2: This phase of the program will begin in April 2014, and a total of 500 signalized intersections in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area are expected to be retimed. Selected corridors will be implemented under this phase of the project by December 2016.

Link List for All Corridors [pdf]

Map and List of All Locations [Coming Soon]

Performance Measures for all Corridors [Coming Soon]

Contact Information

Natalie Bettger, 817-695-9280 / nbettger@nctcog.org

2) Light-Emitting Diode Traffic Signal Lamps Replacement Program.   As of May 2005, 74 percent of the existing incandescent lamps have been replaced with LED lamps, and it is estimated that 90 percent of the existing lamps will be replaced with LED lamps by Spring 2009. 

2/6/2014  12/30/2008 BW

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