Community Development

The Texas Community Development Block Grant Program (TxCDBG) plays a critical role in helping smaller communities in our region meet infrastructure needs in low- to-moderate income areas. Administered statewide by the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA), TxCDBG is the Community Development Block Grant Program for rural communities. 

Communities that are eligible for the TxCDBG funding are called non-entitlement communities, which are cities with populations under 50,000 and counties with a non-metropolitan population under 200,000. They are called non-entitlement because entitlement areas are eligible for funding from the federal Community Development Block Grant through HUD.

At the regional level, NCTCOG assists TDA in the administration of the TxCDBG Community Development Fund (CDF). The CDF provides grant funding to cities and counties for water, sewer, housing, and other improvements. 

Please visit TDA’s CDBG Announcements page for recent news about the program. For more information, visit the links below or contact Erin Blackman at eblackman@nctcog.org or 817-608-2360.


2022-2023 Texas Community Development Block Grant Program

The application period for the upcoming TxCDBG Community Development Fund is expected to be open September 2022 to May 2023. More information will be added once available.  

Documents


2021-2022 Texas Community Development Block Grant Program

Documents 

The guidebooks, guidelines, and application for this cycle are available below:


Community Development Fund Eligible Communities


North Central Texas Recent Grant Awardees
Community Development Fund 

Through the Community Development Fund, awards of up to $500,000 are available for projects that benefit at least 51% low- to moderate-income persons. Priority is given to projects that address water, sewer, and housing needs in the region. Most incorporated cities with populations under 50,000 and counties with populations under 200,000 are eligible to apply.
Congratulations to those in the North Central Texas region who received grant funding in previous cycles. The 2010-2021 recipients are listed below.
 
2021 Recipients

Angus
Aubrey
Boyd
Godley
Gordon
Granbury
Josephine
Keene
Mobile City
New Fairview
Oak Valley
Palmer
Quinlan
Rhome
Springtown
Strawn
 
2020 Recipients

Alvord
Blooming Grove
Caddo Mills
Campbell
Graford
Grandview
Hood County
Mabank
Milford
Princeton
Reno Rio Vista
Springtwon
Terrell
2019 Recipients

Blue Ridge
Commerce
Dublin
Garrett
Glen Rose
Gordon
Kemp
Mineral Wells
Mingus
Newark
Rice
Richland
2018 Recipients

Aurora
Caddo Mills
Celeste
Corsicana
Cresson
Dublin
Ennis
Granbury
Hunt County
Italy
Johnson County
Kerens
Lone Oak
Newark 
Pilot Point
Reno (Parker County)
Rosser
Stephenville
West Tawakoni
Wolfe City
2017 Recipients

Alvord
Dawson
Emhouse
Farmersville
Ferris
Frost
Garrett
Graford
Grandview
Greenville
Kaufman
Kemp
Lipan
Milford
Mineral Wells
Pelican Bay
Quinlan
Rice
Richland
Rio Vista
2016 Recipients

Alvarado
Blooming Grove
Bridgeport
Campbell 
Celina
Chico
Corsicana
Crandall
Glen Rose
Graford
Hackberry
Joshua
Kaufman County
Kerens
Palo Pinto County
Scurry
Stephenville
Tolar
Venus
West Tawakoni
 
2015 Recipients

Alma 
Bardwell 
Barry 
Caddo Mills 
Celeste 
Commerce 
Dawson
Dublin 
Ennis 
Frost 
Hood County 
Italy 
Lone Oak 
Mabank 
Palmer 
Rosser 
Strawn 
Wolfe City
 
2014 Recipients

Anna
Aubrey
Boyd
Cool
Cresson
Emhouse
Farmersville
Garrett
Godley
Goodlow
Graford
Hackberry
Johnson County
Kerens
Melissa
Palo Pinto County
Quinlan
Springtown
Terrell
2013 Recipients

Alvarado
Bardwell
Bridgeport
Celeste
Chico
Corsicana
Ellis County
Ferris
Frost
Grandview
Greenville
Hunt County
Italy
Kaufman
Mabank
Palmer
Pelican Bay
Stephenville
Tolar
 
2012 Recipients

Caddo Mills
Dawson
Emhouse
Hackberry
Hawk Cove
Kerens
Maypearl
Newark
Palo Pinto County
Red Oak
Reno (Parker County)
Rice
Rio Vista
Sanger
Strawn
Terrell
2011 Recipients

Aurora
Bardwell
Boyd
Bridgeport
Cleburne
Commerce
Cool
Dublin
Goodlow
Graford
Kaufman County
Milford
Pelican Bay
Springtown
Venus
West Tawakoni
Wolfe City
 
2010 Recipients

Anna
Aurora
Blooming Grove
Dawson
Garrett
Godley
Graford
Greenville
Hood County
Lipan
Lone Oak
Parker County
Pelican Bay
Rhome
West Tawakoni
Community Spotlight
The City of Blue Ridge has replaced sewer lines, opening an area of land for development that will provide economic opportunities for current and future residents. The sewer line work was completed in early 2022 utilizing grant funds received in 2019 from the  Community Development Fund.

The City of Kaufman completed a project in 2019 to repair and upgrade their storm drainage system. They utilized funds received in 2018 from the Community Development Fund to address flooding issues along Dallas Street. 

The City of Garrett has rebuilt several city streets to provide better access to neighborhoods, allowing school buses to transport children safely and allowing residents to avoid damage to their vehicles. The street work utilized funds received from a 2019 grant from the Community Development Fund.

The City of Gordon has begun work to update and repair its Water Treatment Plant’s filtration and treatment systems. The changes are necessary to provide treated water for all residents. The work is utilizing funds received from a 2021 grant from the Community Development Fund.

The City of Springtown will be replacing aging infrastructure in areas that need water and sewer system upgrades. Grant funds received in 2020 and 2021 from the Community Development Fund will make these improvements possible. 

The Community Development Fund is a category of the Texas Community Development Block Grant program. This program, administered by the Texas Department of Agriculture,  plays a critical role in helping smaller communities in Texas meet their infrastructure needs. Since 1974 the block grant program has supported the development of viable communities by providing decent housing and suitable living environments. The program also seeks to expand economic opportunities, principally for people of low to moderate income.
 
The fund has generated the following benefits in North Central Texas in the last 10 years.
  • Provided grant funds to 88 communities
  • Funded 218 projects
  • Benefitted more than 170,000 residents
  • Awarded more than $50 million
Fair Housing Information
Fair Housing

The 1968 Fair Housing Act protects people from discrimination. You cannot be denied access to a home solely on the basis of color, race, religion, sex, national origin, disability, or your familial status (children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under the age of 18).

The TDA and TxCDBG are committed to affirmatively furthering Fair Housing in conjunction with the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs (TDHCA). Affirmatively furthering Fair Housing is a requirement of the CDBG program and TDA requires units of general local governments applying for CDBG funds to successfully affirmatively further Fair Housing.
More details regarding Fair Housing in Texas and the Fair Housing Act may be found on the TDHCA website at the following link: http://www.tdhca.state.tx.us/housing-center/fair-housing/index.htm.
 

NCTCOG's Fair Housing Brochure

Fair Housing Facts

In recognition of April as Fair Housing Month, the Department of Housing and Urban Development provides the following facts concerning the Fair Housing Act:
‚Äč
-The Fair Housing Act protects everyone. No one can be denied housing because of their race, color, religion, sex, national origin, familial status, or disability.
-The assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King on April 4, 1968 prompted passage of Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, known as the Fair Housing Act. The bill was signed by President Lyndon Johnson on April 11, 1968.
-Within one year of its passage, HUD began receiving 1,000 complaints a year. By 1988, complaints leveled off to about 5,000 a year.
-In 1989, additional amendments were implemented to strengthen the Fair Housing Act. They extended the act to cover discrimination based on disability and family status and added new enforcement mechanisms. These new provisions stimulated a dramatic increase in complaints. By the mid-1990's, HUD was receiving 10,000 complaints a year.
-HUD works with some 80 state and local agencies to review and investigate fair housing complaints In the last 9 years,
-HUD and its partner agencies have resolved nearly 25,000 complaints.
-HUD and its partner agencies found 4,000 cases of real discrimination.
-Two-thirds of the housing discrimination cases investigated by HUD resulted in positive outcomes for the complainant.

Here are some of the protections we enjoy because of the Fair Housing Act:

-Apartment managers cannot deny housing to blind people just because they have seeing eye dogs.
-Apartment buildings with 4 or more units, built after March 13, 1991, must be accessible to people with disabilities. If the building has more than one story, but no elevators, then the ground floor units must be accessible. If the building does have elevators, then all units must be accessible.
-Apartment owners and managers must approve reasonable modifications to apartments and common areas to accommodate people with disabilities, as long as those tenants pay for the modifications.
-It is not permissible to ask whether an applicant for an apartment has a disability or to ask about the nature or severity of the disability.
-An Administrative Law Judge can order landlords who discriminate to pay penalties.
-Mortgage companies cannot discriminate when making loans. HUD is proud of the fact that nearly 120 mortgage lenders have gone a step farther by signing a Fair Lending Agreement, to promote the principles of the Fair Housing Act.
To file a fair housing complaint, contact the Department of Housing and Urban Development toll free at 1-800-669-9777.

Fair Housing Information Resources

The State of Texas is committed to Fair Housing. Following are some of the sources of information and/or assistance:

Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity 
Department of Housing and Urban Development 
451 Seventh Street. S.W. , Room 5116
Washington, D.C. 20410-2000 
(202) 708-2878

For the National HUD Discrimination Hotline, call 1-800-669-9777, or for the hearing impaired, call TDD # 1-800-927-9275

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)Region VI 
801 Cherry Street, Unit #45, Suite 2500
Fort Worth, TX 76102 
(817) 978-5965

Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs
221 East 11th Street
Austin, TX 78701
(512) 475-3976 (main line)

Housing Assistance Council 
1025 Vermont Avenue, N.W. 
Suite 606 
Washington, DC 20005 
(202) 842-8600

Fair Housing Links

HUD Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity
The John Marshall Law School Fair Housing Legal Support Center
National Fair Housing Advocate Online
Fair Housing Institute
Past Meetings
TxCDBG Prioritized Projects Public Meeting
Monday, June 27, 2022
1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Presentation

Community Development Week Event
Aprile 8, 2021 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Agenda
Presentation
Recorded Video


Unified Scoring Committee Training and Meeting
July 9, 2020 at 9am
Meeting Information

TxCDBG Prioritized Projects Public Meeting*
Tuesday, May 19, 2020
1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Video conference information
Recording of the Public Meeting

Community Development Week Webinar
Friday, April 17, 2020
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Presentation
Recording of the Webinar

TxCDBG Prioritized Projects Committee Meeting
Tuesday, April 14, 2020
1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Presentation
2019-2020 Prioritized Project Types
Recommended Priority Project Type

*Due to public health concerns, both HUD and the State of Texas have extended options for telephonic and virtual public meetings. For more information please visit https://gov.texas.gov/news/post/governor-abbott-allows-virtual-and-telephonic-open-meetings-to-maintain-government-transparency

Regional Review Committe Meeting
No meetings held in 2019

Regional Review Committee Meeting
Monday, July 9, 2018
Metroplex Conference Room
NCTCOG Offices, CPII
616 Six Flags Drive
Arlington, TX 76011

Regional Review Committee Meeting
Wednesday, August 16, 2017
9:30 am - 11:30 am
William J. Pitstick Executive Board Room
NCTCOG Offices, CPII
616 Six Flags Drive
Arlington, TX 76011
Scoring Methods for TxCDBG
Rule Change to Scoring Methods for TxCDBG

The TDA adopted new rules on February 24, 2020 that change the process for creating criteria and scoring methods for the TxCDBG. These rules dissolved the Regional Review Committee (RRC) that previously chose the criteria and prioritized project types for funding. Every grant cycle TDA will convene a state committee, the Unified Scoring Committee (USC), to select the criteria. The USC will have a representative from each planning region. The region is still responsible for determining the priority project types.

To determine priority project types, NCTCOG created a survey of all the eligible project types and sent it to non-entitlement communities in the region. The survey asked if communitites would like to keep the previous project types or select new ones. It gave respondents the opportunity to rank all eligible project types as 1st Priority, 2nd Priority, or not a priority. NCTCOG hosted an in-person public meeting on June 27, 2022 to discuss these results and seek further input. Non-entitlement communities were notified of the meeting and public comment period 30 days in advance via newspaper ads, mailed postcard, and email reminders.

The following are the priority projects that the North Central Texas region selected for the upcoming grant cycle.
 
Priorities Project Types Points (out of 50)
1st Drainage, Streets/Roads, Bridges, Water/Sewer, Parks & Rec, Fire & EMS 50
2nd  All Other Eligible Project Types 25
Section 3
Section 3 Transition Guidance

HUD’s Section 3 final rule went into effect July 1, 2021.  Active TxCDBG grants must transition to the new documentation process as described in Policy Issuance 20-01: Federal Revisions for Section 3 Requirements. TDA's Transition Reference List contains 2019 and 2020 grants that will be transitioned by TDA into TDA-GO in addition to 2021 grants that are already in TDA-GO. 

Policy Issuance 20-01 added the newly created Section 3 documents to the existing thresholds for requesting grant funds.  All contracts requesting payment of grant funds for the first time under one of the following thresholds AND contracts requesting additional funds after previously satisfying the threshold requirements in effect at the time must provide the following Section 3 documentation as required by the Policy Issuance: 

Group A:  Section 3 Service Area Map
Group B:  Facilitation of general employment opportunity information (agenda or minutes documenting a public presentation to the local governing body) 

For services contracts awarded on or after July 1, 2021, please ensure that your local files contain records of the efforts to facilitate contracting opportunities for Section 3 Businesses. For all services contracts and subcontracts subject to the new Section 3 final rule, please ensure that your local files contain records of both the actual hours worked on the project per employee AND the efforts to identify potential section 3 workers as new employees are needed for the project.

For questions regarding the new Section 3 policies, please email CDBGReporting@TexasAgriculture.gov and include in the subject line “Section 3 TA”.

HUD Section 3 Opportunity Portal and Business Registry

Under HUD's Section 3 program, persons with low- and very-low incomes can get employment and training opportunities from organizations who receive certain HUD financial assistance. Businesses that provide economic opportunities to persons of low- and very-low incomes are also eligible for contracting opportunities from organizations who receive certain HUD financial assistance.

To help coordinate this assistance, HUD has created an Opportunity Portal and Business Registry to match Section 3 Residents to jobs and training opportunities and Section 3 Businesses to contracting opportunities. This will help communities that receive HUD funding find a business or contractor that will work on HUD projects or satisfy a HUD requirement. Eligible businesses must demonstrate that they are responsible and can successfully uphold the terms and conditions as outlined in the proposed contracts.

Section 3 Resident: any person who is a public housing resident or a person who resides in a metropolitan area or non-metropolitan county of the project and whose family income does not exceed HUD low income limits

Section 3 Business: a. 51% or more owned by residents of public housing or persons whose income does not exceed HUD’s local area low-income limits(i.e. Section 3 residents); or b. Comprised of 30% or more full-time employees who are Section 3 residents; or c. Can provide evidence of a firm commitment to award 25% or more of sub-contracts to businesses that meet a. or b. 

Section 3 Recipients and Employers: any entity that receives funding directly from HUD such as a public housing authority, a city or county department of housing and community development, a state or other HUD grantee.
Texas Community Development Program's Other Funds
Funding Sources for Improvement of Water/Sewer Systems, Other Public Infrastructure, and Housing

The Texas Community Development Program (TCDP) provides grant funding to cities and counties for improvement of water/sewer systems, other public facilities and  infrastructure, and housing. The non-entitlement portion of the CDBG program is administered by the TDA. The TCDP includes the funds listed below. 

Community Development Fund (CDF)
The CDF is available on a biennial basis through regional competition for assistance to eligible cities and counties to address public facilities and housing needs. Eligible activities include infrastructure projects such as sewer and water system improvements; street, bridge, and drainage improvements; and housing rehabilitations. 

Planning and Capacity Building Fund
Funding is available on a biennial basis through a statewide competition to provide assistance to eligible cities and counties for planning activities that assess local needs, develop strategies to address local needs, build or improve local infrastructure capacity, or that include other needed planning elements. The planning process undertaken with these funds should result in an improved local capacity to identify long and short-term needs and to develop implementable strategies to address the identified community needs.

Small Town Environment Program (STEP) Fund
Funds are available for grants on a direct award basis to cities and counties to provide grant assistance to cities and communities recognizing the need and willingness to solve water and sewer problems through STEP self-help techniques. The STEP approach to solving water and sewer needs recognizes affordability factors related to the construction and operations/maintenance of the necessary water or sewer improvements and then initiates a local focus of control based on the capacity and readiness of the community's residents to solve the problem through self-help. By utilizing the community's own resources (human, material and financial), the necessary water or sewer construction costs, engineering costs, and related administration costs can be reduced significantly from the cost for the installation of the same improvements through conventional construction methods. TCDP staff will provide guidance, assistance, and support to community leaders and residents willing to use self-help to solve their water and sewer problems.

Disaster Relief/Urgent Need Fund
The Disaster Relief Fund assists communities on an as-needed basis for recovery from natural disasters, such as a drought, flooding, or tornadoes, where the Governor has proclaimed a State disaster or has requested a federal disaster declaration. Depending on the nature and extent of the damage caused by the natural disaster, priority for the use of TCDP funds is the restoration of basic human needs such as water and sewer facilities and housing. Assistance is available through the Urgent Need fund for projects that include activities to address water or sewer urgent needs that have resulted in either death, illness, injury, or pose an imminent threat to life or health within the affected applicant's jurisdiction.

Economic Development
Supports rural business development, retention, and expansion by providing funds for public instracture, real estate development, or the elimination of deteriorated conditions. 

Renewable Energy
Grants for renewable enery technologies to help rural communities reduce energy costs for their water and wastewater treatement facilities. 

Texas Capital Fund
This fund offers grants to eligible communities for economic development needs by providing infrastructure and real estate improvements in support of businesses willing to create/retain jobs. The TDA administers this program. 

Housing Fund
The Housing Fund is available for infrastructure development to support affordable housing activities through the Housing Infrastructure Fund and for housing rehabilitation activities through the Housing Rehabilitation Fund.

Housing Infrastructure Fund: Funds are available to provide grants on a direct award basis for the infrastructure development to support the construction of affordable single family and multifamily low to moderate income housing. The funds may not be used for the actual construction costs of new housing.

Housing Rehabilitation Fund: Funding is available annually through a statewide competitive process for grants to cities and counties to provide loan or deferred loan assistance for the rehabilitation of existing owner-occupied and renter-occupied housing units and, in strictly limited circumstances, the construction of new housing that is accessible to persons with disabilities. Application selection and scoring criteria for this fund will place some emphasis on housing activities that are targeted towards the provision of accessible housing for persons with disabilities. Housing units that are rehabilitated under this fund must be brought up to HUD Section 8 Existing Housing Quality Standards or local housing codes.